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Why working with partner boosts productivity

New research has revealed that as many as two thirds of Britons currently employed at the same company as their significant other feel that working in such a close environment has had a positive impact on their work output

A money saving website recently conducted a new study in a bid to discover how those who work with their partners feel it effects their productivity and careers. The research sought to understand more about the office environment and how it effects the results and motivations of employees.

The team at www.VoucherCodesPro.co.uk polled a total of 2,102 respondents with an even gender divide for the purposes of the research. Each participant was aged 18 and over. In order to be eligible for the survey, all respondents stated that they were in full time employment at the same workplace as their partner.

Of respondents taking part in the research, just over a fifth (23%) were already in a relationship with their partner prior to being employed by the same company as them. Of the remaining 77% of individuals, who’d met their partner as a result of working together, the average length of their relationship was 7 months.

All those taking part were asked how they felt working with their partner affected their work output and productivity, just over two thirds (67%) confessed they think it improves their work performance. When given a list of answers and asked to reveal why they felt their performance had improved, the main reasons were given as follows:

1.       My partner and I are competitive about our performance- (36%)

2.       I work well with my partner - (25%)

3.       I want to impress my partner- (22%)

4.       I spend less time texting or calling my partner while at work - (18%)

5.       I feel under more pressure to work hard since working with my partner - (12%)

When relevant participants were asked if their boss or any senior members of their office were aware of their relationship, the majority stated that they were (66%). When these respondents were asked what attitude their seniors had to their relationship, only 15% confirmed that their seniors were happy about it, while 63% were unhappy and the remaining 22% had not commented or shown no leaning either way.

Respondents were then asked whether they would leave their job if they were to split up with their partner, with the majority (61%) revealing that they probably would. A further 22% stated that they would expect their partner to leave their position.

Nick Swan, CEO and Founder of VoucherCodesPro.co.uk, made the following comments regarding the findings of the study: "These results are the complete opposite of what we expected. You would think that working with your partner would bring all kinds of distractions, but it seems we actually spur our partners on with a bit of healthy competition!"

He continued: "I would, however, advise that anyone in a similar situation in the future remains fairly tight-lipped about their personal life, as office gossip doesn’t take too long to spread, and chances are your bosses might not be as thrilled about your new relationship status as you both are!"

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